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100 Centennial Recipes: Celebrating 100 Years of Progressive Flour Milling in Texas

1936

This 32-page, 1936 booklet, produced by a group of flour mills in the Southwest, contains one hundred recipes for baked goods designed to promote the use of flour.

Date Range

1930-1939

Tag(s)

Recipe

Original Format

Advertising, Pamphlet

Country

United States

Scanner

Michigan State University Libraries Gerald M. Kline Digital and Multimedia Center

Document Pages

32

Resource Type

Text

Resource Identifier

4061

Format

pdf

Language

English

Repository

Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections, The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Culinary Collection

Source

Chitwood, Ida. 100 Centennial Recipes: Celebrating 100 Years Of Progressive Flour Milling In Texas. The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Collection, MSS 314, Special Collections, Michigan State University Libraries. Available at http://www.lib.msu.edu/exhibits/sliker/detail.jsp?id=4061

Sliker Description

The front cover shows grain silos on the right with yellow and orange sun rays behind them. Below the silos is the exposition logo, and the flour mill logo below that. The back cover has six bags of flour including Gladiola, LaFrance, Light Crust, Liberty Mills Hearts Delight, Tidal Wave, and Marechal Neil. This item was mailed with the "100 Centennial Recipes" from Gladiola Flour. That item includes the original mailing envelope.

Relation

MSS 314

Citation

"100 Centennial Recipes: Celebrating 100 Years of Progressive Flour Milling in Texas." 1936. Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections, The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Culinary Collection, MSS 314, Collection Little Cookbooks. The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Collection, Chitwood, Ida. 100 Centennial Recipes: Celebrating 100 Years Of Progressive Flour Milling In Texas. The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Collection, MSS 314, Special Collections, Michigan State University Libraries. Available at http://www.lib.msu.edu/exhibits/sliker/detail.jsp?id=4061. http://whatamericaate.org/full.record.php?kid=79-2C8-A10&page=1

Rights Management

Permission is granted from the copyright owner/holder.

Contributing Institution

Michigan State University: Libraries, MATRIX: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of History

Collection Info

Title: Little Cookbooks. The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Collection

Repository: Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections, The Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Culinary Collection

Historical Note: Little Cookbooks contains thousands of food and cookery related publications produced primarily by companies in the United States from the late nineteenth century up to the present. The collection provides a rich resource to study the evolution and history of advertising, food products, individual companies, technology, food preparation, and food production. It was organized, described, and donated in 2005 by Shirley Brocker Sliker, who continues to add items to the collection. In 2006 the Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Library Endowment was established to enhance Little Cookbooks through acquisitions, conservation, digitization, and dissemination endeavors. Thanks to this generosity, efforts are now underway to describe and when possible digitize and create a fully searchable freely available online collection. Little Cookbooks is an ongoing project. New items from various companies are being scanned regularly. The images of these items are added to the site after quality assurance and copyright permission checks have been performed. Please visit Special Collections, Michigan State University Libraries, to see the print copy if it is not available electronically.

Donor: Shirley Brocker Sliker

Rights Management: These materials are either in the public domain, according to U.S. copyright law, or permission has been obtained from rights owners or best effort has been made to find the copyright holders to ask permission. If you have reason to think otherwise please let us know. The digital version and supplementary materials are available for all educational uses worldwide.

Finding Aid: http://www.lib.msu.edu/exhibits/sliker/index.jsp

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